This may seem simple but I often times hear from graduates with a growth mindset about how they should have studied things more deeply before coming to the final exam. While this is certainly true in some cases, it’s not always the case. In fact, some students with a growth mindset will do just fine on tests without studying for the topics. And while dynamic study modules can definitely help you do well on the exams, they are not the primary function of this study program. Here’s why.

what is required to access dynamic study modules?

If you were to ask any graduate with a growth mindset about what is required to access dynamic study modules, they’ll tell you that you need to be able to understand and memorize a large amount of information in order to succeed on the exams. This is the primary function of the modules. And memorizing large amounts of information is something that you cannot do if you don’t know what is required to access it. Studying for the exams requires you to understand and memorize the information that is required to get passed.

Misconception in Dynamic Study

However, many graduates with a growth mindset do not think about studying as being a function of memorization and understand that studying should be a process that helps you learn. They also incorrectly believe that by accessing too many modules that there is too much information that they must learn. The only way to make sure that you have enough information to pass your exams is to study for the modules but to access only those portions that are needed for passing. And students with a fixed mindset do not do this because they believe that they will need to “know everything” when they go to the classroom.

The second misconception that I hear students with a growth mindset make is that the primary function of dynamic study modules is memorizing facts. While memorizing facts is a necessary part of the curriculum, memorizing the facts in the wrong order can actually make studying more difficult. This means that someone who wants to get the most out of their class should get the information from their professors, read their notes, and then formulate an argument based on their notes. While this sounds very simple, getting the information from the source, rather than regurgitating it in your mind, is very effective. In fact, it is my belief that it should be the first thing that you do in order to improve your grades.

The third misconception I hear from students with a growth mindset is that the primary function of dynamic study modules is to allow students to “think outside of the box.” I completely agree that this is a valuable skill for any student to develop, but not at the expense of memorizing information and regurgitating it. It is important that students access the information that they are studying and that they do so in a way in which it actually makes sense. Doing so allows students to use what they have learned, and build upon it in real-life applications.

Myth in Primary Function of dynamic study modules

Another common myth is that the primary function of dynamic study modules is to allow students to “think outside of the classroom.” Again, I completely agree that this is a valuable skill to develop, but memorizing facts and regurgitating them does not help students think creatively or come up with new ideas. In fact, memorizing facts and passing them down as dogma will not give students a chance to develop new ideas or to apply them in real-life situations.

Finally, another commonly held myth is that the primary purpose of dynamic study modules is to allow students to “learn by doing.” Again, I completely agree that this is valuable for almost any student, and I would not recommend using it as the only method of instruction. However, it does allow students to apply what they have learned, as well as develop critical thinking skills.

This brings us to the last myth: that dynamic study modules help a student “assess what a student already knows and where he or she stands.” Again, I completely agree that this concept is valuable, but I would not base this point on what a study module looks like or its format. A module can be color-coded, have charts and graphs, have personalized content, etc. However, this should not be the be-all-and-end-all of the definition. In most cases, a module allows a learner to get more involved with the subject matter by developing problem-solving skills, and then exploring and synthesizing what they have learned through real-time application.